Tibetan Terrier

Description

The Tibetan Terrier is well known for its heavy coat. The coat has two layers. The top layer is straight and smooth. The bottom layer of the coat is soft and thick. The breed has straight front legs and well angled back legs. The head of this breed is average in size. There is a defined stop. It has longer than average size eyes. The ears, which are somewhat obscured by profuse fur, hang down and lie close to its face. It has an elongated and well-muscled neck that extends to its straight back and somewhat sloping shoulders.

Temperament

The Tibetan Terrier is a good family companion. It is generally gentle with children and gets along fine with other pets in its household. It may not work as an effective guard dog, but it does bark to alert its family of visitors to the home. This breed has a tendency to act shy. Training it at an early age may help to alleviate its tendency to be shy.

Height and Weight

The male Tibetan Terrier is about 15-16 inches tall while the female is usually less than 15 inches tall. Both types weigh about 20-24 pounds.

Health Problems

The Tibetan Terrier is generally a healthy breed, but is susceptible to develop hip dysplasia, lens luxation, and progressive retinal atrophy (PRA).

Ideal Living Conditions

The Tibetan Mastiff is suitable for both indoor and outdoor living conditions. The breed has an average energy level and will remain active indoors. If kept outdoors, this breed should be enclosed within a well-built fence.

Exercise

The Tibetan Terrier is energetic and should have regular opportunities of exercise. The breed is happiest with high-octane physical exercise, but will do fine with a walk.

Life Expectancy

The Tibetan Terrier has an average life expectancy of 15-17 years.

Litter Size

The Tibetan Terrier has an average litter size of 6 puppies.

Grooming

The Tibetan Terrier has a long coat that should be brushed or combed on a regular basis. This will keep the coat smooth and tangle free. During the two times a year that its coat sheds, it should be brushed more often.

Origin

The Tibetan Terrier originated from Tibet as a companion.

Group

Non-sporting

Color

All colors are acceptable for the Tibetan Terrier.