Cane Corso

Description

The strength and power of the Cane Corso are evident in its appearance. It is average in size and has a lengthy torso that is muscular. Its head is large and square in shape. The muzzle is wide and deep. It has a definite stop. From its profile the thick and well-muscled neck angles to the muscular back. This breed’s coat is thick, close to the body, and dark in color. The legs are well muscled and somewhat short in comparison to the length of its body.

Temperament

The Cane Corso has an intimidating appearance, but it is actually a gentle and easy-going breed. The breed is an excellent watch and guard. It is protective of its family and their property. It will do fine with children, but it is not a suitable playmate for very young or small children due to its size. It generally gets along with other pets, The breed is typically reserved around people it doesn’t know. It is a smart breed that responds well to training.

Height and Weight

The Cane Corso is an average of 23-25 inches and weighs about 88-110 pounds.

Health Problems

The Cane Corso is a very healthy breed that is not associated with any genetic conditions. Due to its size, the breed may develop hip dysplasia.

Ideal Living Conditions

The Cane Corso is most suitable for outdoor living conditions, but will do fine in an apartment or any other type of small living conditions.

Exercise

The Cane Corso has a high energy level. This breed needs a significant amount of exercise. If this breed resides outside it will obtain most of the exercise it needs. Indoor types will require more opportunities of exercise. The Cane Corso has an endurance level that enables it to keep up with an owner who runs or performs any other high energy-activity.

Life Expectancy

The Cane Corso has an average life expectancy of 9-12 years.

Litter Size

The Cane Corso typically has 6 puppies in a litter.

Grooming

The short coat of the Cane Corso does not require a significant amount of grooming. Brushing the coat on a regular basis will help to keep any loose hairs from accumulating. More brushing is required during shedding season, but this breed is only a light shedder.

Origin

The Cane Corso originates from Italy

Group

Mastiff

Color

A wide range of colors are acceptable for the coat of the Cane Corso. These colors include varying shades of gray, black, red. A combination coat of these colors is also acceptable. The breed may have minimal white markings.